Episode Sixty-One – Piece of Cake

Episode Sixty-One - Piece of Cake

Carolyn McMakin, MA, DC Kim Pittis, LCSP, (PHYS), MT

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4:26 Disc herniations, low back pain – easy 5:39 Multiple FMS machines. Getting more done in less time. Working with first responders treating both physical and mental. 17:58 Heaviness of the diagnosis 19:46 The importance of having a plan 19:57 Be adaptable as a practitioner 23:49 Phantom limb pain 27:21 fractured tibia, fibula, hip fracture 32:30 ACL post-surgical 35:00 Treating the brain and the body with FSM 38:16 FSM Advanced and Symposium 2023 schedule done 40:03 Small fiber neuropathy 43:36 PTSD 47:47 Remotely programming the CustomCare 51:28 Four minutes left 55:07 Kim’s quote

Episode Sixty-One – Piece Of Cake: Video automatically transcribed by Sonix

Episode Sixty-One – Piece Of Cake: this mp4 video file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Kim Pittis:
I think the eclipse did something crazy.

Dr. Carol:
Because I didn't even know there was an eclipse. We had an eclipse Of what?

Kim Pittis:
There is a lunar eclipse. Our friend Dave Burke sent me a beautiful picture of it, actually. I also did not know and until I got the text.

Dr. Carol:
So I shouldn't feel bad.

Kim Pittis:
Should not feel bad.

Kevin:
It was going to be the last one for 25 years or something.

Kim Pittis:
Something weird like that. Yes.

Dr. Carol:
But in order to see a lunar eclipse, you have to be up at night when there are no clouds. I live in Oregon.

Kim Pittis:
I go to bed at 830.

Dr. Carol:
That sounds really good. Actually, right after the time change, I started going to bed at 8:30 or nine, and now I'm back to I'm still wide awake. I'll do emails. Oh, it's 12:00 already?

Kim Pittis:
I know. I think it's so funny when I get texts or emails for you in the middle of the night, I'm like, She's up again.

Dr. Carol:
Go to bed.

Kim Pittis:
Go to sleep.

Dr. Carol:
Yeah, it's that's a plan. And I am taking next week off. I texted you because you texted me. Yes. I was supposed to go to John Sharkey's fascia dissection class on frozen cadavers. My brain is just salivating about. Tell me about the Sartorius and the Chrysalis. Actually, I'll tell you about this patient. It's like. I had to look in Netter. There's this attachment on the right pelvis only. That. Have you ever seen somebody play or have you ever touched a string bass? You know.

Kim Pittis:
I've never personally played bass, but I've played guitar and I've watched somebody play string bass.

Dr. Carol:
Yes. Pick The lowest tone is on a full-size string bass. Yes. That's how thick and how tight this lady's chrysalis was. But I had to look in Netter. It's okay. There's your pubic symphysis, and there's this base string. What muscle is that? Those there? Who thinks of the chrysalis? It's this little stupid muscle that's part of the peasants ring that you have to memorize. But whoever has a problem with a chrysalis? This lady.

Kim Pittis:
Yeah, I've seen a few.

Dr. Carol:
First one, 27 years first one. Anyway.

Kim Pittis:
It's quite common with skaters, actually. And I think being a practitioner in Canada, we see a little more of the hockey speed skating crowd has these.

Dr. Carol:
Adduction knee flexion. That all makes sense. But anyway, so my brain really wanted to go to Columbus, Ohio, and the rest of me said, No, just no, we're not going to Columbus, Ohio. You're going to stay home. And go for walks and walk the dog and clean out the books that you don't need anymore and maybe catch up on my emails and maybe go to bed before midnight.

Kim Pittis:
I love you. I love this week for you.

Dr. Carol:
It's like when you consider. The last. Yeah, just the last six months.

Kim Pittis:
Absolutely.

Dr. Carol:
The last year.

Kim Pittis:
Yes.

Dr. Carol:
Yay!

Kim Pittis:
So this is a perfect segway into what the theme for today is going to be.

Dr. Carol:
I love the theme for today.

Kim Pittis:
The theme for today is going to be when it's really that easy.

Dr. Carol:
Oh, yeah. When it's just.

Kim Pittis:
That easy.

Dr. Carol:
You see.

Kim Pittis:
And I think because we are who we are and the patients that we see and the stuff that gets thrown at us sometimes. We think it's more complicated, right? Or we think, oh, it's got to have this, that or the other. But the universe gave me some amazingly easy slam dunk straight up. Patients this week.

Dr. Carol:
I never have those.

Kim Pittis:
Don't either, but I'm not questioning it to talk about.

Dr. Carol:
It. Thank you very much for the easy ones. Yes.

Kim Pittis:
Because I think it's important to not go back to basics and not overcomplicate things. But we have to remember that sometimes. And it's funny because I had this patient, I had three straight-up disc herniations this week, and it's only Wednesday.

Dr. Carol:
Piece of cake.

Kim Pittis:
Piece of cake. And the guy said, wait a minute, I just told you I have had disc bulges and herniation for seven years. I've been in and out of work and out of worker's comp. I can't ride my motorcycle anymore. I can't play with my grandchildren. And you said this is going to be easy. I'm like, yes.

Dr. Carol:
Thank you very much. How's your thumb? And he said, What hurts? Why do you ask? Never mind. Just lets. It's two machines. It's. Yeah.

Kim Pittis:
So I want to talk about the disk herniation for a quick second, because I think a lot of us see low back pain. Low back pain is the number one ailment in America right now.

Dr. Carol:
Facepts, psoas, ureter, dunk.

Kim Pittis:
Yeah. And. I'm explaining this guy's symptoms to him. Like they love it when you do that. Let me guess. You have pain when this happens or when that happens? How did you know? I'm like. Because, like you, you want to be textbook. You want to have this very classic set of symptoms. I couldn't do what I did, though, without four machines this week. In an hour. I just have to I have to say this. So it was super easy. And I had somebody from an eight out of ten after three visits to a zero out of ten going back as a first responder. I see first responders, so fire police, paramedics. I give them all a very big discount because we need these folks back to work. They have terrible benefits. For the most part, I'm a cash practice. So for stuff what I do, it's going to be cash. So I give them a big discount. But with that, I can only see them for about 45 minutes. To bring pain from an eight to a three at least. That's one machine. So with that's just nerve pain, That's just cord. That'll bring the pain down right away. Then we have to treat the disc. So torn and broken in the annulus on one machine, because that's just got to do its thing. Concussion on the other machine because of the stuff. And then 40/89 on another machine, because these first responders are you wouldn't think they're afraid to move but they are afraid to move when it comes to their spinal cord.

Dr. Carol:
And the other thing that 40/89 does with first responders, they see so much trauma, bad things. And they're not allowed to stop. Processing is not a thing. You get desensitized to it, and your brain is still sensitized. Your brain is sensitized. You put those reactions, those emotions in a box, and you put them in the back of the closet and you take them out, I don't know, one night after three margaritas, I guess, on your day off. The 40/89 part is not just for central sensitization, it's for that. And you can also do that with concussion and vagus, which runs 47 minutes.

Dr. Carol:
You can just delete 35 and 102 because. They're not going to stay balanced anyway.

Kim Pittis:
No. That's right. So, that that was four machines. We all know when we're trying to figure out is it disc or is it facet? One of the easiest ways I think we talk about it in the Core we talk about it in the Sports is just, does it feel better? Does it hurt flexing or does it hurt extending? The disc people do not want to flex forward. The facet people do not want to go into extension and have more of that compressive force. So this patient who had the herniation and the history of the disc bulges could only sleep prone. Only wanted to sleep flat. That's a good seat. Now, finally, I can say that's a good face, because having him lie face down on the table while you're treating can be tricky. Because when they get up, they're going to have to go into extension and a lot of times, even though they are presenting as a desk patient, they're going to have set issues. Especially the first responders, because. Especially first responders over the age of 50, there's just degeneration.

Dr. Carol:
So our first responders over the age of 50?

Kim Pittis:
I see quite a few of them. They love their job.

Dr. Carol:
Doing their job. The other way you can treat them is face up with their legs flat. So the one is an extension.

Kim Pittis:
So I wanted to do some traction with L5 as one and some mobilization. The only way you can really do that is face down. And then. But anyways, patient gets up and if I only had a camera, the look on their face when they're exactly searching, stoned and searching. People who are listening to the podcast, you have to go back and watch it on YouTube because Carol just did the exact face that your patients have and I think 40/89 and running concussion at the same time of treating the pathology in the disc. Once you throw everything at it and yes, you probably could have spread it out for 4 hours, but I'm not sure if it would have the same effect because, like you said, treating concussion, treating torn and broken in the annulus, treating 40/89, having it all together and what?

Dr. Carol:
Hip pain takes care of the lumbar disc. It's a lumbar disc?

Kim Pittis:
It was lumbar disc. Yeah. L-4, L-5. And then treating he had some referrals. So that was 43/96. It was really just that easy.

Dr. Carol:
And everybody listening understands that it's only easy in our world.

Kim Pittis:
And I got that this week. And think that is the message that I needed to learn this week. And I'm going to have some questions for you this week that we talked about, I think on podcast number one. And I want to just compare and contrast what we did on podcast one with whatever this one is, 50-something.

Kim Pittis:
But patients teach us so much. And if they don't teach us something, there are at least reminding us of what we maybe have filed back in our brain. So you talk about all the machines you use. We talked to Ben. He likes just using one and focusing on one. There's really no right or wrong way to do things, but there is. You only have 45 minutes. I couldn't have done it without four.

Dr. Carol:
Yeah, I broke my own record this week.

Kim Pittis:
Eight.

Dr. Carol:
Nine. Nine. I did.

Kim Pittis:
Let's hear it.

Dr. Carol:
It's really good. He came out. Where did he come from? Out of state. And. Oh, it came from Florida. And he gives me the MRI of his two knees. He's had two knee surgeries. His recent MRI has torn meniscus. Medial and lateral on one knee. Medial on the other knee. Tendinopathies everywhere. Degeneration. Cartilage is funky. And he's coming to me to avoid surgery. And it's okay, first thing I need to tell you is that's not possible. Our treatment goal for your knees is, your 66, our treatment goal is to put off your knee replacements until you're 70. That is our treatment goal. You can't fix them. I can't put tissue back that's not there. And I can get the pain down, but it's not going to last. So that's your knees. I have this neck thing. And then. Oh yeah, I have SIBO. Oh yea, and I have. So actually, I think he was only five machines patient after that. That's the other one after that. She was told and believes with all her heart that she has ankylosing spondylitis for the last 22 years. All she has, that's a good face, is bilateral sacral artists after being a basketball player from age six through college. Of course you have sacral artists. Oh, but I have this and I have.

Dr. Carol:
And the more I showed her that a rheumatologist was maybe. And she thought she had all this inflammation and it's all this autoimmune disease and it's all this. And that was the trauma. And there's beautiful timeline. So yesterday I was ready to fire her. I don't like patients that I have to argue with. Brought my biology book. And I said, okay, you can have any ankylosing spondylitis if you want to, but sometimes rheumatologists are wrong. And then in this beautiful timeline. She did put in where somebody diagnosed her with Lyme, four out of five bands. And they treated with antibiotics. Yay! Oh, yeah, I forgot to mention. I tested positive for Stachbotrys with Real Time Labs. It wasn't on the timeline. Took a deep breath and said, How did they treat it? Oh, my naturopath put me on Glutathione IVs for six weeks, twice a week for six weeks. That's a good face. No binders, no itraconazole. And this patient is an anxiety control freak. And a psychologist. I didn't tell you where she came from and it wasn't from here. So I think I'm safe anyway. So. We had that conversation that she said so the day before. She has Achilles tendonitis and I touched like her muscular tennis junction with the Achilles and the Gastrox soleus.

Dr. Carol:
510 grams of pressure. She said, Oh, it just flared up, my pain so bad. And I went, okay. She said, So what are you going to do? What are we going to do today? And I said, I don't know. Every single time. I tell you what we're going to do. It doesn't go well. You get to pick. What do you want to have treated?

Dr. Carol:
It does? I said you haven't noticed. You've been with me almost a week. So you get to pick. I want my neck and arms to go better. Torn and Broken on the disc. Supine cervical pant. Practicum manual. She's so centrally central sensitized. So 40/10. 40/89 Concussion and Vagus. And on the midbrain, the frequencies for Lyme and mold in the midbrain. Lyme and mold and spinal cord. Lyme and mold in the Vagus. All by hands on the 40/10 machine. Right. And at the end of it. Her arm pain was gone. Neck muscles relaxed. She actually moved her shoulders instead of being afraid of them and her terrible level six or seven pain down at her Achilles went down from a seven to a two or three, and that took nine machines. And also want to cross the gut.

Kim Pittis:
And does this patient have a custom care?

Dr. Carol:
Oh. Speaking of control, freak, she took the course and bought her own CustomCare. And she's got most of the frequencies. Wow. Okay. So I'm going to have to since I can't give away chocolate in the office, we're going to invest in some gold stars because we had three gold Star people yesterday. It was so much fun.

Kim Pittis:
To unpack with that patient. Sometimes patients come in with that heaviness of the diagnosis. Right like the over I talked about the universe gave me very simplified people this week. Sometimes you're unpacking the stress and the trauma and the heaviness of a diagnosis, right? So sometimes and I think we see a lot of it, and I know in the last couple of years we're seeing a lot or I'm seeing a lot more autoimmune. I know we're treating a lot more autoimmune conditions and we're aware of it and that's great. I think it's important to remind patients there is so much you can do with autoimmune. Like it's not a death sentence. It's like any condition. It can be manipulated, you can adapt. And as long as the patient has a little bit of an open mindset of making dietary changes, supplement whatever, I think a lot of it and you're so good at this, is just diffusing the load that patient comes in with.

Dr. Carol:
And she refused to be diffused. She said, Oh, I have HLB27. I said, So do about 14% of the population. And not all of them have autoimmune diseases, but then the mold made everything make sense. Of course you're anxious. She said. What? Of course you're anxious. And it's not like you're anxious. Your body is anxious because it's Stachybotrys. Here's what you're going to take. And here's the thing you're going to look up and you're going to actually find somebody that knows how to treat the mold. Because until the mold gets better, nothing else is going to get better.

Kim Pittis:
I think this is a good segue to talk about the importance of having a plan.

Dr. Carol:
You had a plan and I keep derailing the train off the tracks. So I'm really.

Kim Pittis:
Sorry. I am adaptable. That is my thing. That is what somebody told me the other day. Like you were one of the most adaptable practitioners I've ever worked with. And I'm sorry, but working with professional athletes, as long as I have, that is the number one criteria you need as a practitioner is they're never going to listen to the heel and re-injure at a rate that would give you whiplash. And you have so many practitioners helping one athlete. You have to be able to change courses and pivot just like they have to. So having a plan, though, is so important. No matter what you're treating, whether you're treating somebody with autoimmune Lyme mold or a straight-up disc herniation, you have to give that patient confidence that you have a plan, and the plan may change.

Dr. Carol:
And that they get to vote.

Kim Pittis:
And they get to vote. Like you said, that patient, the minute you gave her the power, right? Changed everything.

Dr. Carol:
And the outcome is best we've had all week.

Kim Pittis:
Fascinating.

Dr. Carol:
What is it? The definition of insanity is to do the same thing over and over again and expect a different outcome. If so do something different.

Kim Pittis:
I've never been a fan of Dr. Phil, but I find them to be a bit of a bully. But he would a lot of a bully. But he would say something that was quite good. And when somebody would do what you were saying the same thing over and over again, how is that working for you? I find myself saying that to certain patients who have seen the same PT for six months and haven't gotten any better and they defend those habits or they defend those practitioners and that's wonderful. But sometimes you just have to say this is clearly not working because you're not getting better.

Dr. Carol:
And the person that they've developed a relationship with, they have the relationship and the person told them, this takes a year. Yeah. In our world, it's four weeks. Six weeks? You have a sprained ankle in your neck. And the first thing you have to do is stop breaking it. You're not allowed to do this, that or that for six weeks, and then I'll see you twice a week for. 4 to 6 weeks and it'll be done. And it's okay if you don't. You have to give them permission to be skeptical for sure, because half the time I do things I don't believe.

Kim Pittis:
That is so true. And that's how I was with this one disc patient. Am I going to feel better after this one treatment? And I said, I'm pretty sure you will, but let's just see. Sometimes it takes a bit longer. And I knew if it was really as easy as. All signs were pointing he was going to feel better. And then the next day he walked in and was like. They were all right about you. And I'm like.

Dr. Carol:
Who?

Kim Pittis:
Everybody. You are a coworker. I'm like, Oh, goody, thanks.

Dr. Carol:
And when they say, Am I going to be better? And it's my goal today is to not make you worse. Just lower expectations. Yeah. And they've heard about you and it's something. And then when they get up and their pain went from an eight to an eight to a two.

Kim Pittis:
And it stated to until they came to see you two days later. That's always my sticking point because I'm pretty confident I can bring somebody's pain down no matter what.

Dr. Carol:
Piece of cake.

Kim Pittis:
Isn't that crazy to say that out loud and to see it live in front of people. And it's not about me being that good I'm just that confident in Microcurrent. I'm not confident in manual therapy, but it's making it stay.

Dr. Carol:
Speaking of miracles and doing the impossible. When we were in Chicago. Remember the lady I told you that had huge six-inch screws through the L4-5 and S1 one nerve roots? L4-5, I think. And so she had phantom limb pain. Right. I ran 40/89 for an hour and a half. Her pain was a zero for an hour and a half. It lasted eight days. I made her buy a CustomCare before she left. I don't own a PC. I said put it on a credit card. There are $285 at Best Buy. Go. She hasn't bought one yet. The pain came back after eight days. She still doesn't have a PC. She's back on all the drugs. Pain level is still six or seven. Just this is super simple, but to have it last eight days for phantom limb pain, that's amazing.

Kim Pittis:
I would have never been on that, to be honest.

Dr. Carol:
Me neither. And that's the third one. The other two are amputees. One was the leg, one was an entire arm and half of the other arm. Industrial accident. And it's 40/89. It's phantom limb pain. If you can find somebody with phantom limb pain, drag them in off the street and treat them just to convince yourself that it's possible. I haven't ever had it fail. And that's part of what makes me a little nervous. It's like there's got to be somebody it doesn't work on. But so far, I haven't found anybody.

Kim Pittis:
Phantom limb pain like this is funny. So this is what I mean talking to you. This is why I'm a little pessimistic sometimes. I don't know the pessimistic, skeptic when it's that easy, because I think we like the scientist in us tells us what we're doing is'nt possible anyways.

Dr. Carol:
Who else can do it?

Kim Pittis:
And then having the results last and again approaching it with cautious optimism.

Dr. Carol:
And when it's 100%, that's the thing. It's like there's got to be a boundary someplace where it's not going to work. And I haven't found it yet with phantom limb pain. And it doesn't matter where the nerve is that's been cut. In your abdomen…

Kim Pittis:
I just got this flashback of reading, was it "The Body Electric" right? It was Becker's research. And that's almost what it was. He was amputating salamanders.

Dr. Carol:
And then put a battery on them and it grew back.

Kim Pittis:
So there's something there, I think. Not that we're growing limbs back, but…

Dr. Carol:
Salamanders didn't need a battery. They create their own because it works and it's the current of repair. So the trick for us is we supply the current to keep the current flowing. We increase ATP. We reduce inflammation. And the ability to modify the nervous system is the most powerful thing we have. Yes. Yeah. Yes.

Dr. Carol:
The other thing we did yesterday is this lady, 2003, had a compound fracture of her tibia and a spiral fracture of her fibula. Which means that the inner osseous membrane was toast and it was a plate and six screws in the tibia. They took the hardware out a year later. That's 2003. 16 years later. She's had her right hip, fractured and replaced in '17 she had the right hip done. In '19. she had the left hip done with an anterior approach. Hip was done posterior approach. After they did her left hip, her right lower leg, the one that was fractured, went completely nuts with pain. And it's talk about wishing that you were there. It's like Kim, when I need her and when somebody decided to put his thumb into her right groin and work on her psoas. She went to a massage therapist that does neuromuscular therapy and he puts his thumb into the groin and two days, four days later, she developed pelvic floor spasticity and pelvic floor spasms. And her pelvis is all torqued and cattywampus. So I got her iliac crest level by treating one broken in this and that and scarring the nerve and scarring the lymphatics. And why are they? Never mind, I'll just fix it. And so we have her stand up and her or illiac crests are even. Her glutes are different, but they're both firing. We spent an hour teaching her to walk again because they had her on crutches for a year. Not a cane because she's tall that are on crutches for a year. Non-weight bearing on this tibial thing in 2019 when the wheels came off. Just like your hair looks like your brain is exploding in there.

Kim Pittis:
I need adult beverages in my tea is what I need to hear the story.

Dr. Carol:
And when I looked at her history, I looked at her history and I said, This is why we don't have alcohol in the clinic, because I just. Yeah. And so we spent an hour teaching how to walk. And reliably the pelvic pain got worse. But she could still walk. So, Susan today put her on. The reformer ran. 40 and 89 to quiet down the central sensitization. Got the muscles in her. Hips balanced. And she said, What do I do for the pelvic pain? I said, 124 and 77, torn and broken. If you look at what happens to the pelvic floor muscles when the aliens go walk. Like completely. Fort. What's. Look, I got Netter out. So I'm not going to Ohio, but I got Netter. You look at net Netter and the whole pelvic floor is attached to the ilium by connective tissue.

Kim Pittis:
Yeah. You can't underestimate that ob trade or membrane. That is. It is a profound piece of connective tissue that, like you said, it is it is what holds that pelvic floor and permits the pelvic floor to contract. So if there is scarring or tearing, it will never fire. You will never strengthen that pelvic floor. You will never get anything to turn.

Dr. Carol:
On except for spasticity the whole.

Kim Pittis:
And that is like unhealthy tone. That's right.

Dr. Carol:
Freakin' out. This was the other thing. She said, When my glute contracts. The patient will tell you what's wrong with them. When my glute contracts. And when I went glute and pelvic floor. Huh? So I get Netter out, opened up Netter turn to the pelvic floor, and there's the glute max connected to the coccyx, which she said, My coccyx went totally over to the left about the time that glute Max went crazy after that guy did that thing. Oh, yeah. Best 3 hours. At the end of this. It's 7:30. Quarter to eight at night. And Susan and I are doing the happy dance. And I love my job. I love my job.

Kim Pittis:
I love the happy dance. I'm going to make a bold statement by saying that 40/89 is going to be one of the game-changing protocols that we use. I obviously do a lot of athletes, but I've been rehabbing my own daughter's ACL post-surgical repair and not to say anything out loud because then it might be real. But she's two months ahead of schedule and nobody can really understand the recovery. How fast the girth of her legs came back. And not only just that we got mass back, but coordinated, confident movement. And let me stress those two adjectives, because if you are in sports medicine and you're treating athletes coordination and confidence are key, you sounds almost egotistical like, oh, I could get somebody back. Yeah, that's the easy part. But the confidence in which they believe they can move after having a graft done and then doing single leg hops on a grafted knee with and, no, that was me. I didn't want to watch it. The practitioner in me made me look at it though, and instead of looking at her knee, I was taping it. I looked at her face because that's where you see the confidence of the movement. I'm like, I'll go back and watch the tracking. After there was not an eye on a fear or hesitancy.

Dr. Carol:
It was 81/84.

Kim Pittis:
Yes. And this has been spliced into her the protocols that I created for her since our one post-op. The minute I could get my hands on her, it was 40/89. So it is a catalyst for undoing scar tissue. It is a catalyst for increasing tone and coordination. And without the confidence. No, hang on. Without the pain reduction, without the healthy tissue. There are steps right? You have to get the pain down so that there's freedom of movement. You have to have the increase in elasticity, and pliability, health of the tissue. Then you have to get the firing going. But it's more than just increasing secretions in the nerve. It's coming from the midbrain.

Dr. Carol:
And that one slide. I guess I'm going to have to redo the Core again and make that one slide in about five places It's the slide that has from the arthritic knee up the spinal cord. There's a little side track to the cerebellum that says, Yeah, you will not contract the vastus medialis thank you very much. Then it goes to the midbrain, and the midbrain sends the signal to the sensory-motor-cortex. It sends it to the anterior cingulate, it sends it to the prefrontal. Everything goes to the hippocampus, the amygdala, and the thalamus. So it comes up, goes to the cerebellum, and the cerebellum says, okay, we're not using the vastus medialis. And then there is another pathway from the limbic system back down to the cerebellum that says, you better blankety blank, not move that muscle. And the cerebellum says, Yes, sir, ma'am. And it's just when you anthropomorphize the control of the nervous system. And the only way we learned any of this is because we can modify it.

Kim Pittis:
Exactly.

Dr. Carol:
That lets you change it that fast. Why would you know this? Why would you think about it?

Kim Pittis:
Never. Never. And I said, I got my start with all this as a trainer. So I'm always watching movement first. And when would you ever care about the amygdala beyond whatever year you were in college learning about the nervous system because you couldn't never control it. You couldn't affect it.

Dr. Carol:
What sports medicine practitioner in the world even ever thinks about the amygdala or the hippocampus, which in my world is the ruler.

Kim Pittis:
Absolutely. And I think for the most part, athletes are fantastic patients because they want to get better. They will do anything they tell you. I have so many of the pros that I work with that; if I said you need to run through that brick wall so you can play tomorrow, there would be an athlete-shaped hole in the wall because they will do what I say. So I think sometimes those of us who work with athletes don't think that the amygdala and the hippocampus are that involved. But like I said, you need to build the confidence because the confidence in the movement not only gets them back faster, but will prevent them from becoming reinjured with that same injury, because so many times we rush an athlete back and maybe they don't hurt their original. And say, if you had a hamstring injury, you get them back faster. They're not going to hurt their hamstring, they're going to hurt the contralateral side, they're going to hurt the hip flexor. On the other side, there's going to be some sort of compensatory injury. But when you do this, you don't get that there's a clean slate of confidence to work on. It's Oh, gets me up in the morning.

Dr. Carol:
Speaking of which. The Advanced and Symposium schedule is done. It's done. Diana Cross is coming. She was the last one.

Kim Pittis:
How are you packing all of this in?

Dr. Carol:
You should see the schedule. And because I had a hole on Saturday at the Symposium, at the Advanced. I'm going to do the Ehlers-Danlos workshop for the webinar for the people that didn't watch the webinar, because in Chicago we had seven out of 27 people with Ehlers-Danlos.

Kim Pittis:
That's amazing.

Dr. Carol:
That's. Excuse me.

Kim Pittis:
Yeah.

Dr. Carol:
That's crazy. 20% of the population. And how much of it are we missing? So the first test I do now when I'm taking a patient history is would you put your hand on the desk and write your little finger? Thank you. And so, yeah, and the case reports are coming in. We sent out a call for case reports. Symposium case report slots are almost full. Now I just have to figure out what to do with Ben and Dave. Do I give them an hour apiece? Do I put them.

Kim Pittis:
Talk to them? I will do that.

Kim Pittis:
Let them decide. We have to get to some Q&A because, like, somehow 40 minutes went by. All right.

Dr. Carol:
Plaque. Peripheral nerve plaque. Linda that sounds like they're talking about MS. The only people that use the phrase plaque are talking about MS. But MS happens in the brain and the spinal cord. So I've never heard of peripheral nerve plaque. But then small fiber neuropathy, maybe that's the thing. The only experience I have with small fiber neuropathy is what Ben said. Those two frequencies, 438 and 483 are those channel A's? No Channel B's. Those are small fiber nerves that it's on a laminate that I don't have open. But that's a George thing. They're both investigational and apparently they worked. And 80-year-old Anonymous, my good friend, 80-year-old diagnosed kidney disease, high and protein. Oops. Never any kidney stones, but kidney stones aren't the thing that produce kidney disease. Caused by ibuprofen. Yeah. No, don't treat for kidney stones and ibuprofen. Okay.

Dr. Carol:
Everybody take a deep breath. This is my pharmacologist self coming out. Ibuprofen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory. It blocks prostaglandins. Cox one and Cox two. Right? Blocks, prostaglandins. Cyclooxygenase. But there's prostaglandins whose job it is to rebuild the stomach lining. There are prostaglandins whose job it is to rebuild the inside of the blood vessel walls.

Dr. Carol:
Ibuprofen causes kidney damage. If you ever have a chance to go to body worlds, one of the body Worlds exhibits is what happens if you take the kidney tissue away from the blood vessels. So you put plastic in the blood vessels and the kidney, and then you take away everything that is not blood vessels. And the kidney is this lace of capillaries. What happens if the inside of those capillaries just can't rebuild itself because you've been taking ibuprofen, 800 milligrams, 1200 milligrams a day for two years. The blood vessels get I think the technical medical term is thrashed. Right? They get thrashed. The ibuprofen doesn't have anything to do with kidney stones, I'm afraid, anonymous. Don't treat for kidney stones. Treat capillaries. For torn or broken in the capillaries, increase secretions in the capillaries. Hypoxia. And there's no way to reverse, you can't take away NSAIDs. Because NSAIDs are gone. The problem was that the NSAIDs trashed the capillaries and theoretically we can't put tissue back that's not there. But on the other hand, we've done more. Is it Alice in Wonderland that says, I think, three impossible things before lunch?

Kim Pittis:
Maybe.

Dr. Carol:
I think three impossible things before lunch?

Kim Pittis:
Could be. It sounds fitting.

Dr. Carol:
Work on the capillaries. Anonymous. And he's 80 years old, and that's difficult, but essential fatty acids. The vessels. Blood vessels. Essential fatty acids. Start with that. Didn't use the frequency for L4. No. You treat the disc and the nerve. Epileptics which go. Non-epileptic seizure today? Wheelchair. Treated, her with wipe and load. PTSD. This ones yours. This week she's in a wheelchair again. Wipe and load. Not enough today. Who has a non-epileptic seizure? The schedule for PTSD is twice the first week and then once a week for the next six weeks. And there's a lot more history in that, Debbie. Somebody with PTSD doesn't end up in a wheelchair. Phantom limb pain. Does the pain generally return so that the patient requires self-treatment? Yeah, unless they live close to you and they can afford to come see you once every if it lasts eight days, they're going to see you once a week if they want to stay pain free. And then they can wait till the pain comes back and then try and get in. Phase angle hydration. Yeah, actually we have data on that from Guy in Australia. The fatigue angle increases at a rate it doesn't matter what you treat as long as it didn't. He didn't have a protocol to increase phase angle. As long as he treated something that the patient needed, treating from his liver to his gut to his nerve pain to his lower back, as long as he treated something that the patient needed treating, the phase angle went up. Like we're talking 17% No it wasn't 17%, something like 7% in 60 minutes, which Bob Rakowski would tell you was impossible. Anybody that does phase angle measurements, it takes with supplements alone, it takes six months to a year to get it up 1 to 2%, to get it up 5% in 60 minutes. Not possible. And the practitioner's name, it's in the compendium and it's actually on one of the booths that's going to be in the lobby at Phoenix. Come to Phoenix and see it.

Kim Pittis:
Nice.

Dr. Carol:
Resveratrol. Thank you. No, non-dialectic is emotional. No, it's nervous system, but that's another conversation, Debbie. When should Vagus be treated after injury

Kim Pittis:
No. When? Not if.

Dr. Carol:
Yeah. Yes, six weeks. I would. Or if you're treating him immediately after surgery? Probably 3 to 4 weeks.

Kim Pittis:
And then.

Dr. Carol:
Alice in Wonderland.

Kim Pittis:
You were right.

Dr. Carol:
I believed as many as six impossible things before lunch.

Kim Pittis:
And there is something in the chat too. Let's go back to the chat. There is a comment or a questionnaire before we wrap up.

Dr. Carol:
Put my glasses on because this is. Oh, there we go. Flu season comes around. I'm the one who gets sick most longest. Just went through flu, a blah, blah, blah, and you didn't get sick at all. So respiratory plus organs? Yeah, my money's on that. It's every virus are in that three times on top of using restore. Excellent. Blah, blah, blah. Tamiflu. So sure. Sure. Yep. St. C. D. Oliveri. The all of the above. One from column A. Yep. Way to go. Way to go, Danny. Maybe she's technologically averse.

Kim Pittis:
I think that was the patient who wouldn't get the laptop to program with the CustomCare.

Dr. Carol:
Oh, no. She just didn't want to spend the 400 bucks because she's on disability, because she has phantom limb pain.

Kim Pittis:
So I think you have to have to keep reminding the patient in the conversation, like this is just like a little bit more of an investment that's going to save you time, money and pain down the road because you have a tool to control everything now.

Dr. Carol:
And yeah.

Kim Pittis:
The ability to help practitioners out and send them files and have them load it on onto the software and has been…

Dr. Carol:
Oh, software for the CustomCare. I'm finally educated, using it, loving it.

Kim Pittis:
It takes a little bit. I have to remind myself to keep hitting save because I'm not used to hitting save as much. But there's a couple practitioners who have taken the sports courses online who are working with professional athletes, and this has been huge to be able to help them customize a program because it takes me literally a minute to help them really tweak it and dial it in. And it's such a great learning tool for our practitioners because it's not easy. You don't just learn this over a weekend and become really proficient in it on the plane ride home. Sorry, and you're welcome.

Dr. Carol:
The other thing that I need to have them do is make the expiration date required field. It has to be changed because I have sent out to units where I forgot to set the expiration date and the day you. Program.

Kim Pittis:
Yeah. Can we fix that? Because I have done the same thing.

Dr. Carol:
Because I felt like such an idiot.

Kim Pittis:
Because that's new. We've never had to do that before.

Dr. Carol:
We always had to set the out-date. It was like, right theren in your face, like a stealth item or something. Something for you. Oh, before you would get it. That's right. Okay. We'll fix it all, then. All has to do is send Elliot an email and he fixes it. Yeah.

Kim Pittis:
That's amazing.

Dr. Carol:
So, an autosave. Autos. No updates? No. Kim was talking about she just to save it more often?

Kim Pittis:
Yes.

Dr. Carol:
Oh, say would be autosave. Would be good. And you haven't set the update?

Kim Pittis:
Yes, the autosave would be. If I could pick one thing, it would be that because I have a little bit of HD when I get when I start writing programs and then I go somewhere else, and then it all goes away.

Dr. Carol:
And then and then the other cool thing that I did is this. Who was it? I can't remember which patient I did it for, but they had a CustomCare and a converter. And I said, You sleep about 4 hours at a time at night. So let me build a protocol that does neck pain autoimmune yellow back and this and that. And so you just click on all these frequencies. Copy. Go to the protocol that's named nighttime paste. Copy. Paste. Done. Yes.

Kim Pittis:
Yeah. Building. One of the things that I've been working, getting more proficient at, is building these really long programs for people to run overnight because there's you're sleeping. People who are busy. Like I was talking to Dr. Sosnowski. She was helping me with some health things. And you have this wonderful tool that you could use. And I'm like, Yeah, but who has the time to sit? Yes, there's stickies and there's fanny packs and there's all the things. But the one thing I'm good at is going to bed really early and I have a very good sleep hygiene routine, and that would be a perfect time to run protocols at night while I'm sleeping because I'm just lying there.

Dr. Carol:
And my convertor and CustomCare are in my nightstand and I have a CPAP, so I sleep on my back and I put one puck here and one puck there and then put a heating pad, a thermal four on my tummy warming up. God. It's great.

Kim Pittis:
Yes.

Dr. Carol:
It's not. We have four more minutes.

Kim Pittis:
We have four more minutes. And I'm trying to figure out what I want to talk about that we can get in 4 minutes. And I don't know somebody just let's get a couple more questions figured out here.

Dr. Carol:
I'm the battery status, Margaret. The battery status is there. When you program the unit, it will tell you when you when it says check unit, it tells you what the battery status is. So somebody came into the clinic this week with their own custom care and it had 7% battery. That's not enough to even program the thing. So it's like that replaced it. So it's there. Right. As for the user. Oh, it has those four little bars. You just have to wait until it gets to that screen and it's there. They just have to use it.

Kim Pittis:
And then there's something in the chat here, too, I think.

Dr. Carol:
Three messages. Oh, people get itchy pads. They get allergic to the adhesive. Yeah. Yeah. And the discussion, they get allergic to the adhesive, which is why I don't use sticky pads.

Kim Pittis:
I sometimes I have to use sticky pads for people and some ultrasound gel on first and then the sticky pad on top can be a workaround for that. If they're not allergic to it, just use the ultrasound gel.

Dr. Carol:
Yeah. Some people I. Yeah, It's sticky pads. Allergy to the goo.

Kim Pittis:
Yeah. Is that good? Because I do have a question to pose to you.

Dr. Carol:
Just cold, Danielle. What are the instructions for how to call that? Now, that's like outside of my skill set. Okay.

Kim Pittis:
So I always have an alarm that goes off 2 minutes before we end so that we can tidy up everything. It's like running, restore joy or balancing the energy centers before you get a patient to leave. We have to do our housekeeping. So sign up for the Advanced now that the schedule is done, I don't know how anybody would want to miss it this year with that.

Dr. Carol:
We get to come in person and we're videotaping it. But that's no excuse because the Johnson Awards and Jay Shah is coming from an NIH and Jerry Pollock and Jim Oshman and Ben and Dave and Diana Cross and Jen Sosnowski and you and you're doing the three-hour thing that in the morning. But the afternoon, by the way, there is no longer a physical medicine and a visual medicine track because all the physical medicine people have become like you and it's sort of 50/50 you.

Kim Pittis:
I think it's just such a great opportunity to learn that side and you don't have to be proficient. I got really overwhelmed when I first started listening to these talks because my brain was just like, No, we don't treat this. You don't have to learn how to treat it, but just learn for it… Learn tricks and tools that some of these conditions can be on your radar, just like the vestibular screening things and all of that. You don't have to be an expert in that field, but to have a questionnaire and some tools to help identify conditions is well worth the price of admission.

Dr. Carol:
And Bill Clearfield is going to be the going to do a three-hour block on the endocrinology of traumatic brain injury next year. I should be able to talk John Ruski into coming back, because that's that was the other big thing. Yes. I want to go.

Kim Pittis:
All right. I have a little quote. Because I always have a quote. Here it is. A meaningful life is not about being rich, being popular, or being perfect. It's about being real, being humble, and being able to share ourselves and touch the lives of others.

Dr. Carol:
That makes us really lucky.

Kim Pittis:
And doesn't it?

Dr. Carol:
Meaningful lives.

Kim Pittis:
Yes. And I think we get caught up in trying to get the diagnosis. Knock it out of the park. The first treatment and having this perfect treatment and this flawless treatment. And yet. That's right.

Dr. Carol:
And internally, that's the other thing that happens as a practitioner. Well, our lives become more so meaningful because we're able to do things for people to have somebody come in an eight and leave with a two. What's up with that? Who gets to do that?

Kim Pittis:
We do.

Dr. Carol:
And that's a day in the life. That would be so fun. It is so fun. Good quote.

Kim Pittis:
Thank you. I try. Fastest hour of the week has just flown by yet again.

Dr. Carol:
And I'll see you next week.

Kim Pittis:
Perfect. We'll see you then.

Dr. Carol:
Bye sweetie.

Kim Pittis:
Bye.

Kevin:
The Frequency Specific Microcurrent podcast has been produced by Frequency Specific Seminars for entertainment, educational and information purposes only. The information opinion provided in the podcast are not medical advice. Do not create any type of doctor patient relationship, and, unless expressly stated, do not reflect the opinions of its affiliates, subsidiaries or sponsors or the hosts, or any of the podcast guests or affiliated professional organizations. No person should act or refrain from acting on the basis of the content provided in any podcast without first seeking appropriate medical advice and counseling. No information provided in any podcast shall be used as a substitute for personalized medical advice and counseling. Fss expressly disclaims any and all liability relating to any actions taken or not taken based on or any contents of this podcast.

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