Episode Sixty – Vulnerability And Being Authentic

Episode Fifty-Nine - Take Out The Bad, Put In The Good

Carolyn McMakin, MA, DC Kim Pittis, LCSP, (PHYS), MT

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1:27 Circle practicum 7:01 Treating seven Ehlers-Danlos at once 19:00 Increasing secretions and vitality in facia and adipose? 24:21 Take out the bad stuff, put in the good stuff 27:08 Phantom limb pain 35:25 Bulging disc facet blocks 44:09 Thalamic pain fused discs 48:23 Plication surgery 50:37 49/97 with Kinesio tape 52:36 81 in the vagus 56:02 Myasthenia gravis 56:20 FSM is good for humility 58:18 FSM is a language

Episode Fifty-Nine – Take Out The Bad, Put In The Good: Video automatically transcribed by Sonix

Episode Fifty-Nine – Take Out The Bad, Put In The Good: this mp4 video file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Dr. Carol:
Hello. I had some audio issues I was just fixing.

Dr. Carol:
Oh, of course I can. Yeah, and nobody's frozen yet.

Kim Pittis:
We are 10 seconds in.

Dr. Carol:
Exactly. And the only freezing part is me, because somehow the upstairs, it's fall here.

Kim Pittis:
Now it's fall here, too, in Chicago.

Dr. Carol:
It was. I know it looked like Chicago. The airport said it was Chicago, but it was 72 degrees in October. And. That's. I brought a coat. I brought a scarf and never needed any of it. There. Sorry. It's cold in here. I brought.

Kim Pittis:
Yes to keep me warm.

Dr. Carol:
Okay. Can I tell you about Chicago?

Kim Pittis:
Yes. This is on top of the list. Is for you to debrief all about Chicago. Because I was following you on social media. So I know what happened in Chicago. And I woke up to a very funny text message from you with our trifecta, our little group that we have. And I was laughing. So I'll let you debrief about Chicago before we

Dr. Carol:
Sent you a picture of the extravaganza. Yes. Yeah. Yeah.

Kim Pittis:
So you were in Chicago.

Dr. Carol:
Some reason on Saturday. So at the two day practicums, everybody in this practicum weekend, there's 20. They're supposed to be 30. There were 26 or 27, and they'd all taken the Core. And so we did the circle practicum in the morning where you find out who doesn't feel anything and who gets, Oh my God, I can see colors.

Kim Pittis:
Talk about it for the people that don't know because we have like it's a really cool part of the training, actually.

Dr. Carol:
Okay. The first practicum, I have a list of frequencies that almost everybody should have some response to at least one of them. So I start with 40 on A, reduced inflammation and 116 on B and we have data on that. I love data. We have data on that in the mice. So people are big mice. So we were everybody holds hands and I should have one of those John Sharkey things. So everybody holds hands and we run the frequencies through everybody in the class. And over the last 15 years, 18 years that we've been doing that, it is become a complete bell shaped curve. Absolutely, every time. 20% of the class doesn't feel anything, at least not with 40/116. Some of that 20%, it's they don't feel anything with anything.

Kim Pittis:
Right.

Dr. Carol:
20% gets so stoned they have to sit down or they just start giggling or they go, dude, right. It's that's 20%. And everybody else, the 60% in the middle is I think I feel something, but I'm not sure what. So you pause the machine and you tell them. Whatever went away just now is what you were feeling. Because we are taught to interpret frequencies from birth. Basically sound. Mom, Mom, that's not a word. There isn't a word. Yeah, it's a sound each. And you're taught that this flower or this bird is blue. Or Mommy's eyes are blue. They're not blue. That's a frequency that is reflected. Off of a surface when every other frequency is absorbed. And the only thing that's reflected out is blue right now. Blue. That's a frequency. Orchestra. Blah, blah, blah. So we have a way in our sensory cortex of interpreting those frequencies because we've been taught. So we put everybody in a circle and we run 40/116. And it's like this frequency in our world reduces inflammation. But your brain doesn't know what that feels like. Your joint capsule might, your pancreas might. But your brain doesn't have a feeling that goes with 40/116. So who in the group doesn't feel anything? And four people raised their hands. And I said, There are two of you that are afraid to be embarrassed. So where are the other two of you? Because out of 30 people, there's going to be Kevin creeping around the back… Oh, the lights. Oh, yeah. Oh.

Kim Pittis:
You looked.

Dr. Carol:
Good anyway. There are. And then the other two people fess up and raise their hand because it's always a straight up 20%. So that's the circle practicum. And then what I started doing about three or four weekends ago was we used to do the supine neck and shoulder, then the supine cervical because working on the neck with the patient's supine always made me nervous because I had a bad experience one time where they did this on the front, they got distracted… Right. So now, I figured out that the supine cervical practicum is mechanically the easiest for everyone to do, and we do it three times. So we have enough tables so that there are three people per table. Once a practitioner, once a patient, and one of them operates a machine and looks at the slides and there's one instructor for every 2 to 3 tables and they're keeping an eye on. And I wander around and just tell everybody what to do, which is really fun for me. Anyway, so we done the supine cervical practicum before lunch. Then we did it again after lunch. So now we've got two of the three that we need to do. And for some reason, I asked about Ehlers-Danlos and after the break, at lunch time I ran I went through the Ehlers-Danlos webinar that I did and it's frequencyspecific.com/webinars. And once again, first time ever, is there anybody in the room that has Ehlers-Danlos because it's a slam dunk and it be kind of fun If we did a practicum where we just treated the one or two Ehlers-Danlos patients, there were six of them.

Dr. Carol:
What is 6 from 27 is 25% of the class had Ehlers-Danlos. And there was one patient from the outside who was being brought in by her practitioner who also had Ehlers-Danlos. So we had seven tables. And it takes in a perfect world that takes three machines to treat an Ehlers-Danlos patient. One machine is running, torn and broken in the connective tissue that literally somehow changes the length of the connective tissue. Don't know how it works. Never doesn't work. Those of you that know about Ehlers-Danlos, there's nine points. So little finger at or past 90 degrees elbow. It goes backwards 3 to 10 degrees. Knees go backwards 3 to 10 degrees. They go backward to some amount. Two, Four, Six. What's the eighth one? Elbow. Anyway and then touch the floor with flats your hands. Supposed to be nine, so two, four, six. I'm missing something.

Dr. Carol:
Then the previous week, I'd found out that I had an Ehlers-Danlos patient 124 and 77 got her range of motion completely normal. They have stretchy skin. Anyway. But when we got a range of motion normal. Her back pain increased right at T-12 to about L-3. Like that. And she couldn't touch the floor with her hands. That's the ninth score. Nine out of nine on the Beighton score.

Dr. Carol:
Then I remembered that Ehlers-Danlos patients also have a tendency to have tethered cord, so the cord is tethered at T-12 someplace where the cord ends and the dura is tethered. So with one of our Ehlers-Danlos demos, once the range of motion was normal, once the little finger got to 70 degrees, then we switched from… Oh yeah, one is on 124/77 for the connective tissue. One is on 40/10. The body pain diagram for Ehlers-Danlos lists the shoulders, elbows, hands, hips, knees and feet as painful. And in the Ehlers-Danlos world everybody thinks that's joints. In our world, that pain diagram is 40/10. If you think about the disc annulus is made of connective tissue. And Ehlers-Danlos connective tissue is stretchy and leaky, so the disc nucleus gets to leak out, irritate demyelination, interfere with the pain pathways in the spinal cord. So one machine runs torn and broken in the connective tissue. One machine runs 40/10 to get rid of the body pain. And one machine runs concussion and vagus. Because universally with Ehlers-Danlos patients, their heart rates are elevated or irregular. They have POTS, which is a vagus dysfunction. They have digestive system problems and they have psychological issues, anxiety, and depression, all of which are related to vagal nerve dysfunction. So you run a third machine neck to abdomen and treat concussion in Vagus or vagal tone. We had seven tables.

Kim Pittis:
And during the practicum where you just using one machine per table or you loaded them all up.

Dr. Carol:
We loaded them all up. We we only had ten precision cares practitioners brought. Like local practitioners brought their own devices, We had six CustomCare's and everybody had 40/10 or concussion and vegas on it. And we had enough to be able to do it all to everybody.

Kim Pittis:
And just saying to anybody who's a practitioner is listening. If you don't have 124 on A and 77 on B as your own one-liner for your CustomCare, please put it on.

Dr. Carol:
Oh yeah.

Kim Pittis:
Ehlers-danlos are not you're going to have torn a broken and a connective tissue and why waste your PrecisionCare? When you just need that running the CustomCare.

Dr. Carol:
Yep.

Kim Pittis:
What's the first of any rants I have today? Continue.

Dr. Carol:
And this is we started it at six, 6:00 because at the end of the day, we did supine cervical practicum and we went till 7:30. And all but one got up pain-free, normal range of motion. One of the practitioners had a kind of Ehlers-Danlos that I haven't seen before. It involved her digestive system. She was. I'll be fine. They did a surgery on her when she was seven years old because they told her that she was born without a lower esophageal sphincter or cardiac. That's a good face. Cardiac sphincter. And so they did that obnoxious surgery where they go up and they wrap the. That one. Yeah. And then they did that surgery again on her when she was in her. That's a good face in her twenties. For those of you not watching the video. Looks like we just killed her cat. Anyway. And her esophagus has been like. They won't do another surgery on her. She has a lot of difficulty with swallowing that has been helped by running increased secretions in the Vagus. But with her range of motion didn't go to normal. And that's a first. So any practitioners that are listening, patients that are listening, especially practitioners, the first 20 or 30 of any new condition that you treat. You. It's when I was doing fibromyalgia, for example, the first case report was 25.

Dr. Carol:
By the time I got to Blands Symposium, it was 48. By the time I got to close to 100 patients, I actually knew who it would work on, who it didn't and why and what else to include to make it work. This is the first Ehlers-Danlos patient ever that those three things 124 and 77 reduce inflammation in the spinal cord and concussion in Vagus first patient ever. That wasn't sufficient. She was still 90 and her esophagus has been described as paper thin. So she has one of the subtypes of Ehlers-Danlos that is more severe than what we usually treat. Most of what we treat is really either Ehlers-Danlos type one the easy kind. That's just. Musculoskeletal or HSD, hypermobility syndrome disorders there just. We'll get back to her in a minute. For the patients because we had them on the table and I wasn't about to sit anybody up to treat the dura we changed the 124 and 77, torn and broken and the connective tissue. Took the knee up towards the chest and on about 30%. So three tables, the knees stopped at 90 degrees. That means you've got adhesions in the cord in the dura. So we switched from 40 and 10 to 13 and ten scarring in the dura.

Dr. Carol:
We switched to scarring. Sorry, Scarring in the cord. Yeah. And we switched to scarring in the dura. So we were running, scarring in the cord, scarring in the dura at the same time, and just gently rock the knees up. Towards the chest. And rotated a little bit, and then the knee went to the chest almost like. Then they had normal range of motion. And that was it. Now back to the esophagus, lady. I had to go. It was Sunday. No, Saturday, anyway. It was Sunday when I found out about her esophagus. I just knew that she was the one patient that didn't work on Saturday. So Sunday night I'm thinking, what would you do with an Ehlers-Danlos patient where it wasn't just 124 and 77? What would you do with somebody that had the specific kind of Ehlers-Danlos that affects the connective tissue and the digestive system and the arteries? 81 on 142 or 81 and 77. With her, my suggestion was or is if she's listening. It's a don't even get me started. So with her. If she's listening because she and her husband are practitioners in Canada. I would run 124 and the esophagus. Inflammation and maybe increased secretions in the fascia or increased secretions in the connective tissue. Before your brain explodes.

Kim Pittis:
People don't understand how crazy it is when you bring up something. And it's the same frequencies that I want to bring up, but in a different world. So what I wanted to talk about today was increasing the secretions and the vitality, how those two work together. But they're different. And I'm using them with fascia, but also with adipose. Let that marinate for a minute.

Dr. Carol:
Wait. I have an objection that could answer.

Kim Pittis:
Yes.

Dr. Carol:
The adipose secretes inflammatory cytokines. Why would you do that?

Kim Pittis:
So I'm not using it in that way. However, just go with me down the rabbit hole for a second.

Dr. Carol:
Okay?

Kim Pittis:
When we're increasing the vitality. So I'm using this with 49. I haven't used it with 81 yet.

Dr. Carol:
Good vitality. Makes sense.

Kim Pittis:
Yes. Yeah, we don't need to increase the secretions in the fascia, but when we increase the secretions, we don't need to increase the secretions to the adipose. But where I was going is there is a patient and it's so funny that you mentioned supine, increasing hip flexion to get the sacrum, the thoraco lumbar fashion mobilized. So there's this dip.

Dr. Carol:
It's always the dura. Or the cord.

Kim Pittis:
For sure. But when there's something left and you can feel it and it almost felt superficial, I'm thinking, what is it? What is this? And when Adipose has adhesions, it's like a prickly, sharp sort of feeling for patients.

Dr. Carol:
397. Adipose hurts because it doesn't scar.

Kim Pittis:
Yes. Yes.

Dr. Carol:
Got it.

Kim Pittis:
Did it? There is still something left. So I was thinking about this. We were talking about a couple of podcasts ago. The Thixotropy changes, right? When fascia goes from hard to warm and jelly. And there was a study that they're doing with adipose or subcutaneous adipose and fascia having very similar properties that have isotropic changes to it.

Dr. Carol:
So in the adipose did zip. Or did something but didn't get it done.

Kim Pittis:
Just did 49 and 97 and it got so warm and squishy and the patient all of a sudden got completely stoned, close their eyes and said, Whatever you're doing, please don't press anything. Let it just go on that frequency. And this is a person that never felt anything, didn't feel Smush, never got stoned. And it was the craziest thing. So 49, 97 did it.

Dr. Carol:
That's frickin cool.

Kim Pittis:
Yeah. And I was thinking about it. I use rock tape all the time or Kinesio tape a lot. And the whole premise of how I took all my person through Kinesio tape is that the tape helps lift up the skin and the subcutaneous fashion to create space. And then when the space is there, that's when healing, circulation, all the stuff can happen. And so this is what I thought of with using 49, increasing the vitality to the fascia and the subcutaneous adipose. I don't know. I know what I felt, I know what I saw. It was objective. It's worth it.

Dr. Carol:
Now an N of one. This is like the first time I ran 40/10.

Kim Pittis:
Right?

Dr. Carol:
And then the practitioners listening, the next step is to do it again.

Kim Pittis:
Right.

Dr. Carol:
And find out under which circumstances it works.

Kim Pittis:
Right?

Dr. Carol:
Which circumstances it makes it worse, or under certain circumstances. And what patient that feels. What way?

Kim Pittis:
Right.

Dr. Carol:
It doesn't work. Right. Or is it reproducible in that type? So once you identify this is so cool. This is. I love it. So. Under which circumstances? In what? What does it feel like when this is what you need? Create an idea. Create a model. And you hypothesis. That's it. And then you test the hypothesis. In that patient that felt that way. The thing that made this better was 49 and the adipose vitality and the adipose. Will that work this time?

Kim Pittis:
Right.

Dr. Carol:
And then the harder part to me is at what point in the treatment do you do it?

Kim Pittis:
See, this is where I'm at. And with all the education I've received, we typically tend to use 81 and 49, increase the secretions, increase the vitality towards the end, which makes sense because we need to in my brain, I see it as like a snowplow. This is the Canadian meat. We need to clear the way for certain frequencies to work.

Dr. Carol:
Or as Roger Billica would say, you take out the bad stuff, then put in the good stuff.

Kim Pittis:
Exactly. However, I have we are using 81 in the beginning. With certain instances we use 81/10 in the beginning when we know there are an 81/10 patient, I use 81/396.

Dr. Carol:
All the time.

in the beginning. So that's a good point.

Dr. Carol:
For those of you listening, 81/10 is increasing descending inhibition in the spinal cord to increase theoretically the secretions of GABA to relax the muscles. And you usually are aware of these type muscles in the legs.

Kim Pittis:
Correct.

Dr. Carol:
Strings, quads, pectineus and breath especially.

Kim Pittis:
And especially when it is bilateral.

Dr. Carol:
Oh, yeah. It's. Yeah. And once you feel tone, you can't ever not feel for it. Yeah. And then increase secretions in the nerve. Oh I have to tell you about the other one playing change. Increased secretions in the nerve is when you The nerve is inflamed. Yes. It reduces the pain, but doesn't make the sensation normal. So there's still either hyperesthetic or numb or it feels funny or the muscle doesn't pump up. Right? Then you increase secretions in the nerve.

Kim Pittis:
And don't you think it's especially I know because a lot of people have written wait a minute, I thought this was a total 40/396. Now you're talking about 81. And I get it. It can be confusing because the nerve can be inflamed or scarred or need or need increasing secretions. I found in my experience this is just me when 81/396 is indicated, it's almost like losing those last 2lbs. Like you've got the nerve pain down, but it's still like a tube and it still feels fuzzy and right. It's just that last little bit. And then you're like, Oh, it just the nerve needs.

Dr. Carol:
To happen to have five machines in a treatment room. I start running two compressions around 40/396 and 81/396 at the same time.

Kim Pittis:
Yeah, and why wouldn't you? Because when you do that with the cord, I can't remember what condition you tried it out on at first when you ran 40/10 and 81/10 at the same time. And I went to work the very next day. It was like, I know what to do now. It was insanity, how fast that worked.

Dr. Carol:
Now, speaking of nerve, and before we leave that topic, I'm ready. All right. Okay. So phantom limb pain.

Kim Pittis:
Yes.

Dr. Carol:
Phantom limb pain. You amputate the leg, which means you cut the nerve and then the patient has pain in the foot that isn't there. And we found out that the fix for that is to reduce inflammation or the activity of the thalamus. Because when you cut a nerve, the thalamus, which processes pain in the brain starts humming to itself, and that is thalamic pain. We run 40/89 and phantom limb pain goes away. Any of you out there know anybody who has phantom limb pain, drag them in off the street, treat them, document the case and send it to me. All right, so there's that.

Dr. Carol:
The practitioner who was at the seminar. The family nurse practitioner who was in a side impact auto accident in 2019. So three years ago, maybe four. And she's walking with a cane. And I said, Is that hip or knee? And she said, It's both. And then she pulled up on her phone photographs of how they repaired her pelvis. She was hit at high-speed side impact, broke both of her femur, femoral head, neck. And shattered her pelvis. Okay. Now, the good news is she's not dead. Good news is that they put her pelvis back together. The bad news is that they put a six-inch, two six-inch screws through the L-4-5 and S-1 nerve roots.

Dr. Carol:
And probably tagged L-3 as well because she's got hyperactive sensation in the bladder, which gets it sensation from L-3. 4-5 and S-1. And she just mentioned in passing. She was going to be the supine, cervical, supine, lumbar patient. And they're working on her. And I said she said, yes, I have constant pain in my lower legs. L4-5 and S-1. So I had them do supine lumbar to get rid of the scar tissue in her pelvis and from the low back to her feet they did 40 and 396 And she said as I came by to check 10 minutes into the practicum, she said it made the pain in my legs worse. I went. Do me a favor and switch to 40/89. Decrease the activity of the thalmas. If you put a screw through a nerve, you might as well cut it. Usually phantom limb pain takes 10 to 20 minutes to go from an eight to a zero. Took 15 seconds and she said, the pain's gone. Wow. Said, Really? She said, Yeah. So they finished the practicum and I just and we ran a CustomCare on concussion in Vegas. And we let 48/89 run while Kevin took down massage tables and she's laying there completely blissed out because it's the first time in three years that her pain has not been an eight.

Dr. Carol:
Now, just in case any of you are wondering about our some of our colleagues, she was told. By either a neurologist or an orthopedic surgeon that the pain in her legs. You should probably put your cup down. Put it just. It'll be fine. The pain in her legs had nothing to do with the two screws that were put into her pelvis.

Dr. Carol:
Because she was in her fifties, she's only 61, because she was in her fifties, instead of replacing her hips, which they should have done, they put basically tenpenny nails through them. It's orthopedic screws, I'm sure, under sterile conditions. Good news is they're all titanium. But yes. So if you have a patient who has a screw through a nerve or who has a nerve that's been severed. The question you ask and their pain level is a seven or eight and 40/396 makes it worse. Reduce inflammation in the nerve. Increase secretions in the nerve doesn't work. Go to phalamic pain, phantom limb pain. And that's for cutaneous nerves as well.

Kim Pittis:
Right.

Dr. Carol:
So that was the other thing. And that was the other thing I made her buy a CustomCare. She said its an . No, no. Because and I will program it because if your pain comes back, I don't know how long this is going to last, if your pain comes back. She doesn't have devices. I need to know that you have some way of treating yourself. And this is Wednesday. We treated her Sunday. And she is still out of pain after three days. I still don't know what our time parameters are for phantom limb pain or because what she has is phantom limb pain in three nerves.

Kim Pittis:
Yeah.

Dr. Carol:
Oh, those screws don't have anything to do with it.

Kim Pittis:
That hits me right here. How dare you say that to somebody?

Dr. Carol:
How is it that someone who's done dissection anatomy, who looks at the x-rays, can look at the x-rays, know the anatomy of the pelvis and the nervous system and say, Oh, those screws aren't doing anything. Excuse me? How does somebody with a 4.0 in biochemistry get to be that, I'm going to use the word ignorant.

Kim Pittis:
That's polite.

Dr. Carol:
Yeah. Being restrained.

Kim Pittis:
Just you.

Dr. Carol:
But the good news is she's got a life. She. Because it's only been three years. She hasn't reduced her gabapentin yet. I forgot to set the date when you use the 3.0 software.

Kim Pittis:
Oh, I.

Dr. Carol:
Know it has to be a required field. If you're listening to somebody.

Kim Pittis:
It gets me every time because I'm not used to doing that yet.

Dr. Carol:
And it out dates the day you wrote it.

Kim Pittis:
Yes.

Dr. Carol:
Hello. So sticky note on my little thingy.

Kim Pittis:
That's a good idea. It has so many great features, so we shouldn't really complain. But that is something I need to get better at. Let's get to some Q&A before we go any further down our rabbit hole. Cynthia says you brought the warm weather with you. Of course you did. You have a way of doing that.

Dr. Carol:
It was so hot to Portland. It's now not 75 and sunny. It's now 54 and raining, so it's Fall.

Kim Pittis:
I want to talk about this actually, Cynthia, that's funny. What's the problem with the proper frequencies? Does a bulging disc actually return to normal with treatment and time?

Dr. Carol:
And exercises?

Kim Pittis:
Okay, so let's talk about this for a second. You know, how you get those months of it's the shoulder month or it's the knee month and you're seeing everything this month. For me, October has been low back pain due to disc bulging month.

Kim Pittis:
I had a patient who came in and is very like anti injection anti anything. And he's like those injections just mask the pain And I'm like, I get what you're saying. And yes you're right but the whole point is not to just get an injection and be done, just like coming here for a one hour treatment and then you're done. This is to get you out of pain so that you can move. And the movement and the exercises is what is going to help the disc. So sometimes the injections can be beneficial as long as they know. I know you see the failed ones and the things that go.

Dr. Carol:
Wrong and it's like the number one. Yeah. The thing that you need to recognize is the risks? Yes. Infection. The only thing worse than a bulging disk that makes your pain is six or seven is an injection that goes sideways and you get a staph infection. They miss what they should be hitting and they stick a needle through the nerve.

Kim Pittis:
Yes.

Dr. Carol:
Then that's doesn't go well. So. Yes, I have ordered probably more spinal injections than any chiropractor in the state of Oregon or any place in the country. And having dealt with the side effects my recommendation, actually starting in about 2000, was treat them for 2 to 3 weeks until you find out that we can't get it done. And usually it's the facets. But the problem now is you actually can't get a decent facet block. I got a PMNR doc in the class in Phenix last February and I said you can't get a decent block anymore. And he started nodding his head and I said, what is up with that? And he said, You've got anesthesiologists that become injection specialists that have physical medicine and rehab who actually know spinal anatomy and biomechanics. What they do when they do when they do a facet block now is they just block the medial branch that takes the pain away. They used to do in when Roy Slack was doing my injections for eight years, he would actually get the C arm in position, put the needle into the facet joint, inject dye to demonstrate that he was there and not in an artery. Then he would drop steroids and lidocaine into the joint, knock out the inflammation and the medial branch or the proprioceptive nerves on a facet joint. Because of the inflammation and the cartilage inside the joint, there are neurotrophic factors that inveigle invite the nerve into the joint and the proprioceptive nerves change their character and become nociceptors. So getting into the joint, nobody does that anymore.

Kim Pittis:
Right?

Dr. Carol:
Because insurance doesn't pay them for it. Treat for two weeks. And the thing we did, the other thing we did at this weekend was I had time on Sunday to show the supine Sub-occipital activation exercises and then the prone ones. And then somebody said, What about the numbers this patient had? L-5, L-4 discs on the right and an L-1 disc bulge on the left. When they lay prone, you have to keep their legs straight. And think about lifting their leg. And allow them to lift one quarter inch off the bed. And it should be hamstring, glute ipsilateral, contralateral, multifidi. And if the ipsilateral multifidi don't contract, then you have them lifted an eighth of an inch until you have a little. So the inhibition in the muscles is less. And the you go. I go for the multifidi on the rotatories because they bring stability to the segment. Yes, the circulation to the segment. Yes. If you get them moving and they stand up, the big muscles, the QLs, the lats, all the big guys say, Hey, you guys just stay inhibited. We got it. We can get them to walk right? Wrong. Then the disc stays that way. Sorry.

Kim Pittis:
No, that's perfect unpacking for what I wanted to add because the disc frequencies is only a small snippet. And the disc rehab that you're doing so. Yes, torn and broken in the annulus can drop pain down significantly. And when somebody is out of pain, they're more apt to move. But to your point, by the time they're coming to see you, their biomechanics are so messed up that you need to do that reeducation after every treatment. And it's not this huge motor patterning. It's like what you just said, lying down and just getting the harmony back into those smaller stabilizing muscles, allowing them to fire, saying it's safe, you guys can actually fire the person is not going to collapse, it's not going to cause pain.

Dr. Carol:
And they have homework. So laying prone is comfortable for this patient. Yes. Okay. Unless that goes. Facets that are messed up anyway. So lying prone is comfy. Yeah. And they can feel so I have them put their hand on the Multifidi feel what that muscle feels like. Right. So this patient got two reps. The third rep Multifidi is done, so we let him rest for a minute or two. Then he could get the third rep and said, okay, you've got three reps in the morning, three reps at night in bed. And. Then you can stand on the stairs. With your good foot and the foot that is on the side that the disc is cranky. Take that foot and you put it into extension by about three or four inches and just let it swing. And you do that morning and night and I'll see you in three days. And then you double check. Are you doing your exercises? If they have a CustomCare, it's easier. But somebody with a simple disc bulge and you've got room in your schedule to see them three times a week or two times a week. And they're doing their exercises at home. And actually, yes, I do have an N of one with pre and post FSM plus exercise rehab. Part first one. L-5, this one was skinny, dark. Two millimeter, three millimeter bulge. No extrusions, Just one degenerated crummy desc when I was in my fifties.

Dr. Carol:
We did lots of FSM, I did exercises and PT. Blah blah, blah. Five years later, when you would expect that disc to be the same or worse, we did an MRI of my low back because I'd torn my S.I. joint and we needed to find out if it was if at the same time I'd blown the L5 again. The L5 was thick, white, fluffy and bulged. Wow. N of one.

Kim Pittis:
Right? But yeah, that's. Let's answer Jane's question and then we'll move to the other ones, and then we'll continue. Jane asks, Do you think that thalamic pain frequency would help someone with congenitally fuzed? L405 and constant nerve pain in lower back? I've been using the other frequencies with temporary success. The individual now uses one of those other frequencies almost daily. But I've never tried thalamic pain frequencies.

Dr. Carol:
Here's the challenge with 40/89. The normal function of the thalamus is to suppress pain. Suppresses acute pain, but it can amplify chronic pain. I'm curious about what congenitally fuzed means. So then you have. So what does that mean? So what are the pain generators? So if it's fuzed, there's no disc there, or the facet joints or fuzed and the nerve pain is coming from foraminal stenosis. In the low back?

Kim Pittis:
I would think what I have heard, that there's no disc. Born with it. Oh, facets were fused.

Dr. Carol:
I don't know It's like it says congenital. Oh, facets were fused. Then how do we know? Wait, if you have nerve pain, the pain is not going to be on the lower back. If it's L-4 nerve root, it's going to be on the media ankle and the medial knee. If it's L-5 five, it's pain in between the big toes. So the nerve pain is not in the lower back. It's going to be in the leg. That's nerve. That's where the nerves are.

Dr. Carol:
The question is.

Kim Pittis:
They have numbness in the legs.

Dr. Carol:
Okay. Thank you, Jane. Numbness, Numbness and pain. 40/89 is worth a try. And 81/396 is pretty likely to backfire, because what's going to be causing the leg pain is or the numbness in the legs is probably foraminal encroachment. Born with it. Facets fuzed. Not from. Filming walking on the floor. What's a sensory exam like? Is it hypersensitive? Numb? Walking on cotton. Hyposensitive. So it's numb. Try 81/396 and 40/89. You also might have to, if it's been that way since birth there may be a disconnect between the sensory and motor cortex and the L4 nerve root. So that makes sense, actually. So L-4 and 5. And that also means and this is more in Kim's wheelhouse. L-4-5 muscles if the sensation is compromised. That's a good word. Is motor function compromised as well? Will 81/396 do anything to motor strength or coordination? So if you can get sensation normal. If you can get the pain down. Normalized sensation. How much of the loss of sensation is due to the peripheral nerve and how much is because she was born with no connection? Between the L-4-5 nerve root and their sensory cortex.

Kim Pittis:
Then it would be interesting to try 81/192 and increase in the secretions the sensory motor cortex.

Dr. Carol:
And then it's L-5, S-1 on the same side. Yeah, the from the Advanced follow the spark and I think I probably put it in the Core. Follow the spark down or up. And you won't know if it's centralized until you run 40/89. But I suspect you're right.

Kim Pittis:
Let's go over to the chat. I think there was a few comments or questions in the chat. It was slated for the fun plication surgery. The autonomic neurologist said not to do it and increased. Word, my chuckle.

Dr. Carol:
Oh, Kevin.

Kim Pittis:
No, it's me.

Dr. Carol:
Autonomic neurologists said not to do it. Thank you. Oh, increase secretions, increasing acetylcholine. Is secretions in the Vagus and it's that. I can't. That surgery is like, no, that's almost Never mind the lady with the paper thin esophagus. But you might want to put your cup down again. You know what they suggested? I know. Let's take your esophagus out. And pull your stomach up. And then put you on proton pump inhibitors to so the stomach wasn't going to produce. That's a good face.

Kim Pittis:
You know, everybody right now is doing like a Halloween special where everything is scary. This is our scary Halloween episode. That's like insane.

Dr. Carol:
And then somebody else fortunately said, Yeah, we can't help you. Sorry.

Kim Pittis:
Right.

Dr. Carol:
But then the thing that I asked her is, why would they do that instead of removing what is that, 12, ten, 12, let's say 12 inch section of the small bowel which does not produce stomach acid. And just do a auto transplant. But I think 81/142 and 81/77 and 40 and esophagus. Treating her Vagus has gotten her so that she can eat solid food, pureed food.

Kim Pittis:
Right.

Dr. Carol:
But.

Kim Pittis:
Deep breaths. Adult beverages. Continuing on the chat.

Dr. Carol:
Good, good chat.

Kim Pittis:
Would you use 49/97 along with the Kinesio tape? Yeah, I always use tape and frequencies at the same time. Somebody else. Kim, I have tape, but don't use it. I was thinking it's like muscle memory. I use weaponry load. Yes. Gives me incredible results. Good. So much so my MS patient lifted her leg as a reset central nervous system was running. Yes, I'm learning how much our brains messages are so important to our musculoskeletal. Yes, it all starts there. I just want to be in room with you guys talking about how much FSM is amazing, me, and why, let alone my clients, anyone in the UK to talk to?

Dr. Carol:
There are practitioners in the UK. We just did a, I mean there's some really lovely people over there. and the thing that makes FSM practitioners different is nobody else thinks of it because they don't have a tool that lets them manipulate it. So the medical physician that thought about giving the patient the drug that reactivated the esophageal sphincter. Yeah, exactly.

Dr. Carol:
I don't know who Dana is, but spot on. Hydrochloride cause the sphincter to work where the proton pump inhibitors deactivated it, yet the gastroenterologist did not know that the sphincters were activated by low PH, meaning in the GERD should be treated with acid. Hi, Dana. Yeah. What is up with that? If somebody can figure out a way to find a neurologist and a gastroenterologist, pardon my French, that aren't idiots, I would like who? Okay. I'm fine now.

Kim Pittis:
Everybody is okay. And then Jane piped in. One more question here really quick or comment, by the way. Different client that I've asked about before. Finally, she no longer tenses up with 81 on the Vagus Oh, I remember that story.

Dr. Carol:
Talking Vagus increases acetylcholine. And for those of us with stiff person syndrome. Yeah, so on that patient, you had to do 81/10 and 81 in the Vagus at the same time, because 81/10 increases GABA relaxes the muscles and the GABA will do more than the acetylcholine. No? Lost ya.

Kim Pittis:
Yes.

Dr. Carol:
81/10 reduces tone.

Kim Pittis:
Yes.

Dr. Carol:
Oh, thank you, Dana.

Kim Pittis:
What I do.

Dr. Carol:
I just couldn't address the Vagus had to wait ten months for the autonomic neurologist. Thank you. God, there are such a thing. Who, by the way, is. No. Go back to the questions, Kevin.

Kim Pittis:
Oh, sorry. That's me I got. And go there.

Dr. Carol:
When I talked to Jay Shah last night, he's coming on Saturday at the symposium and he's going to do 60 to 90 minutes and he might bring his wife. I'm so excited. We're really lucky. He was there last year when we ran 81/10 on David Murphy. Oh, increased tone, hyperactive reflexes. We ran 81/10 and the only neurotransmitter that would do that is Gabba. Gabba is the neurotransmitter that relaxes. And for reasons I don't understand 81/10 does not increase acetylcholine. So I don't get that. 40/10 relaxes muscles too. I don't get that either. But we know for sure that 81/10 decreases tone, which means it increases GABA. When you're running increased secretions in the Vagus operates on acetylcholine. So when you increase secretions in the Vagus, apparently you are also, which I didn't know, increasing circulating secretions of acetylcholine are circulating levels of acetylcholine. This patient had acetylcholine antibody bodies causing her to contract. If you had acetylcholine antibodies, wouldn't that interfere with. I don't get it. Wouldn't that interfere with the ability of acetylcholine to cause musculoskeletal contractions? Did she have MS? What's that one with acetylcholine antibodies.

Dr. Carol:
Myasthenia. Thank you.

Kim Pittis:
That was just the tip of my tongue.

Dr. Carol:
Okay. Acetylcholine antibody is myasthenia gravis. And the thing with myasthenia gravis is that the characteristic of it is muscle weakness. Yeah. I don't know. Isn't FSM good for humility. There comes a point in every weekend or every five days where I say out loud, you guys understand that we are engaged in clinical research. The frequencies always do what their alleged to do. And you, when you ask me questions like that, the answer is I have no idea. And they go, Huh? So you find out by treating it right. And then there you go.

Kim Pittis:
And we're so lucky that we have this community that we can ask questions to. I had a practitioner reach out, says, I feel so stupid sometimes. And I'm like, No, because there is no reason you would ever need to know any of this stuff in your normal practice.

Dr. Carol:
Or anybody's normal practice.

Kim Pittis:
Right. Exactly. And we all have our gifts. We all have our strengths. So I love getting questions from MD about MSK stuff because they don't need to know that stuff. As long as they don't mind when I'm asking them things. What? Do we have something else coming in?

Dr. Carol:
Oh, it's Dana again. It's she. She was prescribed the patient was prescribed myasthenia gravis, and she was prescribed acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for myasthenia gravis. It wasn't genuine myasthenia gravis, but a vagus nerve Dysautonomias. But yeah, and testing for acetylcholine antibodies or what you call it the antibodies I've got to the GABA receptors in my muscles is really tricky because the medical Eliza test didn't pick it up, but neurosurgery did. And yeah, there's that.

Kim Pittis:
In Jane's message. But this is like being in Nirvana. Due to this level of critical thinking. Yes, Jane, I concur.

Dr. Carol:
There's the percentage of practitioners. That are willing and able, two different categories. Willing and able to learn FSM as a language and then use the frequencies as a way of learning about the connections between. The nervous system, the musculoskeletal system, the difference between weakness and muscle inhibition. The difference between. Yeah, the percentage is improving compared to 20 years ago. I don't have to do even ten years ago. I don't even do a demo during the practicums anymore because ten years ago people came in and they were skeptical. So prove it to me. Now they've heard the podcast, they've read the book. They've watched the webinars. They've done this, they've done that. So they arrive already sold and they already know it works. And so we just don't. Yeah, it's so much fun.

Kim Pittis:
We have to wrap things up, unfortunately. We're already over. So speaking of symposiums and all those things, if you are. Dragging your heels. I would register for all the stuff in February now because things are getting booked up. The FSM Sports Early Bird special ends on November 1st, so get on that one. Your early bird ends at the end of the year. But these are great Christmas presents, so give somebody the gift of education and sign somebody up for a course. I have a fabulous quote I have to end things with. It's a bit it's a big one. So you have to listen.

Dr. Carol:
Okay, I'm listening. Okay.

Kim Pittis:
At the end, what really matters is not what we bought, but what we built. It's not what we got, but what we shared. It is not our competence, but our character and not our success, but our significance. Oh, is it? Doesn't that just fill you up? And I feel like that's what this hour is all about. It's sharing and building and it's not a proprietary secret sauce. This is all about collaboration. And I'm just so grateful for everybody and all of this stuff.

Dr. Carol:
And it's about being thoughtful and caring and putting it together. And that's what you said. Yay! I love it.

Kim Pittis:
I love it. And I love you. And I love everybody listening.

Dr. Carol:
So I love you, too.

Kim Pittis:
Have a great week.

Dr. Carol:
You guys, too.

Kim Pittis:
This was a lot. This is a lot to chew on. I'm going to have to listen to this back. So have a great week, everybody. See you next Wednesday.

Kevin:
The Frequency Specific Microcurrent podcast has been produced by Frequency Specific Seminars for entertainment, educational and information purposes only. The information opinion provided in the podcast are not medical advice. Do not create any type of doctor patient relationship and, unless expressly stated, do not reflect the opinions of its affiliates, subsidiaries or sponsors, or the hosts or any of the podcast guests or affiliated professional organizations. No person should act or refrain from acting on the basis of the content provided in any podcast without first seeking appropriate medical advice and counseling. No information provided in any podcast should be used as a substitute for personalized medical advice and counseling. Phs expressly disclaims any and all liability relating to any actions taken or not taken based on or any contents of this podcast.

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